29 Feb 2016
February 29, 2016

Why Do We Have Leap Years

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A leap year, where an extra day is added to the end of February every four years, is down to the solar system’s disparity with the Gregorian calendar.
A complete orbit of the earth around the sun takes exactly 365.2422 days to complete, but the Gregorian calendar uses 365 days. So leap seconds – and leap years – are added as means of keeping our clocks (and calendars) in sync with the Earth and its seasons. If we didn’t do this, the seasons would shift around the calendar, and in 750 years’ time June would find itself in the middle of winter.
Why does the extra day fall in February?
All the other months in the Julian calendar have 30 or 31 days, but February lost out to the ego of Roman Emperor Caesar Augustus. Under his predecessor Julius Caesar, February had 30 days and the month named after him – July – had 31. August had only 29 days. When Caesar Augustus became Emperor he added two days to ‘his’ month to make August the same as July. So February lost out to August in the battle of the extra days.

SHARING: I do not claim all posts to be my own…I post the sites, who and where they are from, if the source is known.

JOKE OF THE DAY: I hate when I just miss a call by the last ring, but when I immediately call back, it rings nine times and goes to voicemail. What did you do after I didn’t answer? Drop the phone and run away?

HAPPY FEBRUARY 29 ‘LEAP YEAR’ BIRTHDAY TO: Ja Rule 40, Henri Richard 80, Joey Greco 44, Antonio Sabato Jr. 44, Ken Foree 68, Dennis Farino (1944-2013), and Alex Rocco (1936-2015).

 

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